Monday, October 26, 2015

Please Welcome My Guest

Please welcome my guest, Romance Author Louise Lyndon. Louise grew up in country Victoria, Australia, before moving to England, where for sixteen years she soaked up the vibrancy of London and the medieval history of England. She has since returned to Australia and now lives in Melbourne.

In 2013, Louise won first prize in the historical romance category of the Crested Butte Sandy Writing Contest for her story, The Promise, which has since been retitled and is now known as, Of Love & Vengeance.

When not writing, Louise can be found covered in mud, crawling under barbed wire and hoisting herself over twelve foot walls!

Hi Louise, 
Tell us something about yourself both writing and not writing related.

Writing related – I’ve never wanted to do anything else, so I’ve never had a ‘back up’ plan just in case. I’ve never thought to myself I should get a degree in such and such and get my career (day job wise) going just in case writing doesn’t take off. Writing is what I’ve always wanted to do – and so I did it!

Non writing – I hate flying. With a passion. It’s not natural and if I was supposed to fly then I would have been born with wrings! I do take planes, but I don’t like it.

I'm not a big of flying myself. Do you have a writing routine?  Where do you usually do your writing?

I have a day job so the bulk of my writing is done on the weekend. I don’t have a special workspace set up. I generally just sit cross legged on the couch and punch out the words!

Why do you write in the genre/sub-genre that you do?  Any plans in the future to write in a different one?

I didn’t actively choose to write in the medieval period – that was the period where the characters just happened to come from. They didn’t fit anywhere else! But I like that period because I can have my heroes (and heroines) running about with swords. There is so much conflict and danger in that period that it’s a great time to write in.

I’m currently writing a contemporary – and it’s been both challenging and liberating at the same time. Challenging in the sense because I’ve been so used to writing dialogue with a historical slant, so I had to make them sound modern, after teaching myself not to sound modern. It was liberating because I didn’t have to stop and think, ‘did they do this back then and if so, how…’ I didn’t have to go and research how they would have cooked a chicken!

Switching from writing historical to contemporary myself, I completely understand what you mean. How do you stay motivated when writer’s block hits or your muse won’t cooperate?

I force myself to write when my motivation isn’t there. Sometimes, it’s like pulling teeth, but I will not leave the laptop until at least 1000 words have been written. I live by the mantra that it’s easy to edit a page of badly written words than a page with no words.

That's a good mantra to live by. What’s the strangest thing you’ve ever done in the name of research?

I did a Spartan Race! Google Spartan races…I wanted to know what it would feel like to put yourself through something like that. The training, the mindset, and while I may not have used anything from the race, I’ve definitely used the emotional side of it.

What’s the best writing advice you were ever given? 

Write the story of your heart. Don’t worry about what is trending or selling at the moment. Write the story you want to write. I live by that advice every day.

Great advice! What do you like to do in your leisure time?

I’m a huge TV addict. I watch way too much of it. Films too. I read as well.

Tell us about your current release in a couple of sentences.

This is longer than a couple of sentences…I have issues with word counts!

Aveline de Bondeville is on the run. Determined to keep out of the hands of the cruel Raimbaut de Blois she will do whatever it takes to stay alive. And so when she finds herself in the company of Troy de Gysborne she must quickly decide if she can trust him. But can she confess to murder knowing it would mean her certain death?

Troy de Gysborne did the unthinkable; he tore the bonds of brotherhood and left a path of destruction in his wake. And now Troy must face those he betrayed, including the father who long ago renounced him. But to confess to the crime he committed will cost him everything. Including Aveline. But can he remain silent if it means losing the woman he loves?

Can you tell us a little about your next project?

It’s a contemporary romance. It’s got suspense. Murder. Danger. And of course a hunky hero and a kick butt heroine!

Sounds great. Anything else you’d like to share?

Thank you so much for having me. It’s been great to be here.

You're welcome. It's been fun having you as my guest.

BLURBAveline de Bondeville is on the run. Determined to keep out of the hands of the cruel Raimbaut de Blois she will do whatever it takes to stay alive. And so when she finds herself in the company of Troy de Gysborne she must quickly decide if she can trust him. But can she confess to murder knowing it would mean her certain death?

Troy de Gysborne did the unthinkable; he tore the bonds of brotherhood and left a path of destruction in his wake. And now Troy must face those he betrayed, including the father who long ago renounced him. But to confess to the crime he committed will cost him everything. Including Aveline. But can he remain silent if it means losing the woman he loves?

Excerpt:
Aveline’s scream burned her throat; she tasted blood. Eudes staggered forward, his eyes wide. He looked at her as he fell to his knees and then slumped forward. Bright red blood rushed from his wound and pooled on the ground. She looked at Raimbaut.

“This time you shall not escape.”

She picked up her skirts and ran headlong into the forest and did not slow her speed as branches slapped her in the face and tore at her arms. The ground beneath her feet was icy and uneven. She risked a glance over her shoulder and did not stop even though Raimbaut was nowhere to be seen. He may not have been behind her, but it did not mean he was not stalking her.

Sweat trickled down her face and burned her eyes. Her heart pumped, her lungs gasped for air. She came to a skidding stop and looked wildly around. Should she keep running straight, go left or right, or make her way back to Gysborne? She turned in a circle and shoved her hair from her eyes.

A twig snapped behind her. She stilled and held her breath. Out of the corner of her eye, she saw a blur rush by. Was it an animal? Was it Raimbaut?

She ignored the pain in her chest and her sudden need to loosen her bladder. But she could not ignore her trembling. She clutched her arms to her chest. A sour taste flooded her mouth as she did not see how she would be lucky enough a second time to escape from Raimbaut.

BUY LINKS:
iBooks: http://tinyurl.com/odvzs9e

AUTHOR LINKS:
EMAIL:  louise_lyndon@yahoo.com
WEB:
  www.LouiseLyndon.com
FACEBOOK:
  www.facebook.com/pages/Louise-Lyndon/1472910852955051
TWITTER:
https://twitter.com/LouiseLyndon1
PINTEREST:
llyndon3513
GOODREADS: https://www.goodreads.com/LouiseLyndon



15 comments:

  1. Thank you so much for having me! How is everyones Monday going? It's been hectic for me - but the day is coming to an end. It's nice weather here - it's coming in to summer - and i just want to be outside!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thank you so much for having me! How is everyones Monday going? It's been hectic for me - but the day is coming to an end. It's nice weather here - it's coming in to summer - and i just want to be outside!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Louise,

      Thank you for being my guest. Mondays are always hectic for me. It's getting colder here as winter is coming. It's only 34 degrees this morning. I'd much rather be heading into summer. :o)

      Delete
  3. I envy people who can write good historical stories. For me, the research isn't the hardest part. Historical doesn't come into my imagination. I do love reading them, though. Good luck and great sales for Love & Betrayal.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Sandra,
      Some of the research I've done in the past is fascinating. The hardest part for me is to make sure I'm not using modern day language or inferences. Thanks for stopping by.

      Delete
    2. Hi Sandra. I never used to have a historical imagination. I think i developed one because while I was living in England. I used to spend a lot of time wondering around medieval ruins which got me thinking about what things must have been like back then.

      Delete
    3. Katherine, i find those things hard too!

      Delete
  4. Great interview Louise! Spartan races are no joke. Good for you! Inspiring!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi K.K,
      Thanks for stopping in. :o)

      Delete
    2. Thanks, KK! My knees and ankles aren't thanking me for it!

      Delete
  5. Oh, Louise, you're doing a contemporary next? Well, Okay. But hurry back to medieval LOL. Love your stories. But I do sympathize with having to watch for dialogue sounding too modern. I had to smile about the cooking chicken. So true! Best of luck with your latest book.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey Barb! Don't worry i haven't given up the medieval stories. Aymon and Laila have a lot of grandchildren and great grandchildren too who want me to tell their stories. Medievals are my first love - but these contemporary dudes just wouldn't stay quiet in my head!

      Delete
  6. Write the story that you want to write... Yep. Excellent advice. Congrats on your latest release, louise!

    ReplyDelete